Maaike van Everdingen is a graphic designer, curator 
& typographer.
SHE IS BASED IN LEIDEN (NL) AND HOLDS A BSA IN GRAPHIC DESIGN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ARTS UTRECHT
(hello)

About
Known for her distinctive style and unique energetic approach. She loves work that gives a challenge,
interdisciplinary collabs, and making things

Maaike has a deep-seated desire to design like a mad scientist; with a little humour, a lot of associative thinking, and a whole lot of typography.
 As a graphic designer, she often emphasizes qualities through specialized production and a relentless flow of ideas.



EDUCATION

University of the Arts Utrecht NL | 2018 — 2022
Bachelor of Design graduated with Honors

Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Kunsten Karlsruhe DE | 2020
Imagining Tomorrow International seminar

University of Applied Sciences Leiden NL | 2015 — 2017
Propedeuse Biomedical Science


WORK EXPERIENCE

Maaike van Everdingen
Independent Graphic Designer

Exhibition space Troef | since 2023
Curator

Stichting Roem | since 2022
Freelance graphic designer 
Financial manager

WIBAR | since 2023
Bedrijfsleider

Dietwee | 2021
Graphic design internship 

Eiland Studio | 2017
Marketing Internship

please email me for any questions or collaborations, my full cv, interviews or just to say hi!
ABRI MAGAZINEAcademy Gallery UtrechtEach copy of ABRI is different and contains a unique selection of nine poster-sized, double-sided works. On one side magazine interviews and research papers that delve into the subjects of the featured artists and on the other side full artwork spreads.

Published by NPN-drukkers Breda
Print run: 100
42 x 59,4 cm (36 pages, 9 spreads)
ABRI Magazine was officially launched on June 19 at 8 p.m. and was on sale through July 7
via the website www.abri-magazine.nl

Available at:
AG Utrecht (sold out)
abrimagazine.com (sold out)

Art direction, Editing, Design and Printing
in collaboration with Valentino Angela, Clara Bonilla, Annemijn Catshoek, Lotte Cornelisse, Charissa Elward, Maaike van Everdingen, Ella Fengler, Mara de Groot, Anne van der Ham, Dave Haverkort, Agnes van der Heijden, Esmée Jakubowski, Aïsha Kanters, Lea Klamer, Nikki van Laar, Isa Lebbink, Ahmet Liman, Gijs Molenaar, Afke Mudde, Peter Roeleveld, Arta Samakova, Lisette Sanders, Maria Serberie, Jaike van Twuijver, Anke Verbeek, Vera Vogelzang, Sam van Vondelen, Loïs Voss, Godfridus de Vries, Noa Wassink, Carolien Weerstand, Justin Wijberg, Juul van der Zandt
The extraordinary circumstances around Covid demanded different forms of teaching than usual at HKU. For instance, organising an exhibition in the Academie Gallerij of Utrecht proved impossible and all communication suddenly had to take place online. To still be able to show the results of this extraordinary project, we chose to make a magazine. In doing so, we took charge of the entire process ourselves: from the content, design and production of the magazine, to sales and distribution, accompanying website and communication. In the magazine, we share our personal findings about tourism and travel in a visual way. Not through a screen, but in these times of distance, precisely through a tangible medium. 

ABRI Magazine's topics include the relationship between different cultures, the meaning of souvenirs, film tourism, how artificial intelligence will change the future of travel and the most wonderful home holidays. Each copy of ABRI is different and contains a unique selection of nine poster-sized works. The recipient can hang these works at home to create a small private exhibition. When you purchase the magazine, you will also receive a code that gives you access to the ABRI website where you can view all 33 projects. 

ABRI is a project from research on tourism and the research of various aspects of this phenomenon. However, with the sudden arrival of COVID-19, the perspective on the research area tilted radically: what is the meaning of tourism if everyone is expected to stay at home as much as possible? In this period of reflection, how do we view the tourism industry's increasing influence on life in our inner cities? And to what extent will carefree travel be possible in the future?